A little inspiration from Michigan

Have you ever had one of those days?  Maybe you’re even having one today! You know: the kind of day where everything seems to take longer, everyone seems to be grumpy and things just aren’t going your way.  We all seem to have our share of those days.  But the real test of our “mettle” * is how we react and interact with patients and team members on those days!

            (*A person’s ability to cope well with difficulties or to face a demanding situation in a spirited and resilient way)

This high performing team decided on day two of their second visit that the theme of their workshop would be ‘SERVE’.  We used the word ‘serve’ as an acronym and here is what they came up:  S – Sacrifice, E – Effort, R – Respect, V – Victory, E – Excellent!  Let me translate.  To serve patients and each other it requires sacrifice, effort and respect.  They decided that when they did those things they would have victory and be excellent.  AND they were right.  Just take a look at their statistics.

“Hear it about it LIVE from the Doc herself.” Click Here

 

With Maximized Growth Coaching, and full support from their great leadership team, in just 4 short months this amazing team has:

  • Taken their perio therapy from 66 quads/mo to 132 quads/mo – a 100% increase!
  • Incorporated the use of locally applied antibiotics (Arestin) to 3x greater than the previous year = 161% increase
  • Increased hygiene production by an average of $17,000 per month
  • Increased their periodontal maintenance by 77%, from 52 to 92 patients per month
  • Added additional hygiene days
  • Refined verbal skills, treatment planning and enrollment within a large team (2 doctors, 5 hygienists and auxiliary team members)

Join our group of rock star offices!  Check us out at www.InspiredHygiene.com!

Stay Inspired,
Kim

Understanding and Co-Managing the Diabetic Patient

“Has your life or the life of a family member been touched by diabetes?”  I have asked hundreds of people this question and gotten an overwhelmingly positive response.  This is not surprising when we see statistics like we saw in last week’s ezine.

But there’s good news: in many cases, diabetes and its related conditions can be reversed. Warning signs are often seen in the oral cavity in advance of diagnosis.  What if we could intervene early with a referral and help our patients reverse this devastating disease?  How can we best co-manage a diabetic patient?  What are some of the “not-so-obvious” symptoms a diabetic may have?

For answers to these questions and more, be sure to tune in to next week’sHygiene Profits Mastermind Special Topic call when Kim interviews Richard Nagelberg, DDS and Larry Sweeting, DDS, Periodontist, on the topic of Co-Managing the Diabetic Patient.

“Understanding and Co-Managing the Diabetic Patient”
with special guests Richard Nagelberg, DDS and Larry Sweeting, Periodontist

Nagelberg 1 cropped   Larry Sweeting Photo

Over the last two decades we have a seen a huge increase in the incidence of diabetes and related conditions. These conditions often have oral manifestations that can be detected prior to an official diagnosis. In many of these cases involving the Periodontist early is in the patients’ best interest. Additionally the adjunct of pathogen and genetic testing can influence the treatment plan and help the patient control their disease. On this call Drs. Nagelberg and Sweeting will clarify and enlighten us on the following:

  • What you may not know about insulin resistance / diabetes and their effects on periodontal health
  • Co-managing the diabetic patient and working cooperatively with the Periodontist
  • The number one question you should be asking every patient with diabetes
  • KNOW how your patients’ genetic profile effects their treatment plan

Date: Thursday, June 20

Time: 1:00pm Eastern
CE credits are provided by Inspired Hygiene.

Inspired Hygiene is designated as an Approved PACE Program Provider by the Academy of General Dentistry. The formal continuing dental education programs of this program provider are accepted by the AGD for Fellowship, Mastership and membership maintenance credit. Approval does not imply acceptance by a state or provincial board of dentistry or AGD endorsement.

The current term of approval extends from 6/1/2010 to 5/31/2014.

If you’re not already a member of our Mastermind group, the first 2 months are FREE.  Click here to sign up.

Stay Inspired,
Kim

Reported to The Board

A few weeks ago, I had the pleasure of attending The Productive Dentist Academy seminar in Ft. Worth, TX.  I’ve been to PDA many times and I ALWAYS learn something new.

Another fun fact is that Vicki McManus (co-owner of PDA) has been a mentor of mine and I owe a HUGE debt of gratitude for the training, encouragement and kick in the pants she gave me as a new coach more than 10 years ago.  I would not be where I am today with her.

Here I am with Vicki and Dr. Bruce Baird, founder of PDA.

While I was in TX, I met a young dentist with a very compelling story and it got me thinking. He was reported to The Board for not diagnosing periodontal disease. The kicker is that this patient had actually received perio treatment in his office!

That got me thinking and today’s short video training below sheds some light on steps you can take to help prevent this from ever happening to you.

Stay Inspired,
Rachel

Diabetes and Periodontal Disease – Are they epidemics?

Diabetes and periodontal disease: are they epidemics? Now that’s a good question! In fact that’s two good questions, so let’s take them one at a time.

Is diabetes reaching epidemic proportions?

  • There were approximately 246,000 deaths attributed to diabetes in 2012
  • Nearly 23 million Americans have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, up a whopping 8% from 2007’s 17.5 million
  • Total cost of diabetes was $245 billion in 2012, a 41% increase from the $174 billion spent in 2007
  • African-Americans, American Indians and Asian-Americans are all at a greater risk of developing diabetes than Caucasians; there could be a genetic link

Dr. John Anderson, president of medicine and science for the American Diabetes Association is troubled by the increasing costs associated with the disease. But what’s surprising, he says, is that the increased price isn’t due to rising health care costs. It’s due instead to the “sheer number” of Americans who have diabetes.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), diabetes can cause serious health problems such as heart disease, kidney failure and blindness. If it’s not kept under control, diabetes also can cause infections that may lead to leg or foot amputations.

Is periodontal disease reaching epidemic proportions?

  • One out of every two American adults ≥30 years of age has periodontal disease
  • 47.2% or 64.7 million American adults have periodontal disease
  • 70.1% of Americans ≥65 years of age have periodontal disease
  • Periodontal disease is higher in men (56.4%) than it is in women (38.4%)
  • Highest in Mexican-Americans (66.7%) than it is in other races
  • High prevalence in smokers (64.2%)

Dr. Robert Genco, DDS, PhD. believes these findings elevate periodontal disease as a public health concern, stating, “We now know that periodontal disease is one of the most prevalent non-communicable diseases in our population similar to cardiovascular disease and diabetes.”

Are diabetes and periodontal disease epidemics? Perhaps not in the traditional sense of the word, they are however, endemic: widespread, prevalent and common. So what can we do when we are faced with a patient who has both? Join us for the June Hygiene Profits Mastermind Call on June 20 for some answers to that question.

Stay Inspired,
Kim